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Sunday, February 15, 2015

What Makes Men Happy?



http://images.fastcompany.com/upload/happiness_bulldogdrummond.jpg
COURTESY: FASTCOMPANY.COM

Seventy-five years in the making, costing over $20m Harvard study concludes: "Happiness is love. Full stop."

In 1938 Harvard University began following 268 male undergraduate students and kicked off the longest-running longitudinal studies of human development in history.  The study's goal was to determine as best as possible what factors contribute most strongly to human flourishing. 

"At a time when many people around the world are living into their tenth decade, the longest longitudinal study of human development ever undertaken offers some welcome news for the new old age: our lives continue to evolve in our later years, and often become more fulfilling than before.  Begun in 1938, the Grant Study of Adult Development charted the physical and emotional health of over 200 men, starting with their undergraduate days.  The now-classic 'Adaptation to Life' reported on the men's lives up to age 55 and helped us understand adult maturation.  Now George Vaillant follows the men into their nineties, documenting for the first time what it is like to flourish far beyond conventional retirement.  Reporting on all aspects of male life, including relationships, politics and religion, coping strategies, and alcohol use (its abuse being by far the greatest disruptor of health and happiness for the study's subjects), 'Triumphs of Experience' shares a number of surprising findings.  For example, the people who do well in old age did not necessarily do so well in midlife, and vice versa.  While the study confirms that recovery from a lousy childhood is possible, memories of a happy childhood are a lifelong source of strength.  Marriages bring much more contentment after age 70, and physical aging after 80 is determined less by heredity than by habits formed prior to age 50.  The credit for growing old with grace and vitality, it seems, goes more to ourselves than to our stellar genetic makeup."

In Triumphs of Experience, Vaillant raises a number of factors more often than others, but the one he refers to most often is the powerful correlation between the warmth of your relationships and your health and happiness in your later years.

Vallant notes that the 58 men who scored highest on the measurements of "warm relationships" (WR) earned an average of $141,000 a year more during their peak salaries (between ages 55-60) than the 31 men who scored the lowest in WR.  The high WR scorers were also 3-times more likely to have professional success worthy of inclusion in Who's Who.

One of the most intriguing discoveries of the Grant Study was how significant men's relationships with their mothers are in determining their well-being in life.  For instance, Business Insider writes: "Men who had 'warm' childhood relationships with their mothers took home $87,000 more per year than men whose mothers were uncaring.

On the other hand, warm childhood relations with fathers correlated with lower rates of adult anxiety, greater enjoyment on vacations, and increased 'life satisfaction' at age 75

In Vallant's own words, the #1 most important finding from the Grant Study is this: "The seventy-five years and twenty million dollars expended on the Grant Study points to a straightforward five-word conclusion: Happiness is love.  Full stop."

1 comment:

  1. Interesting study, I especially liked the conclusion! Also, I wonder if the results would be the same if the study had been done on women. Thank you for the great read!

    ReplyDelete

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